Exit interview: CHOICE alumnus Solomon Lubinga

Editor’s note: This is the second in an ongoing series of interviews we’ve planned for the students graduating from the CHOICE Institute where we’ll get their thoughts on their grad school and dissertation experiences.

Solomon Lubinga is pharmacist and an applied health economist. After graduating with his PhD from the Comparative Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics (CHOICE) Institute in 2017, he became a senior fellow at the CHOICE Institute at the University of Washington, working with Dr. Josh Carlson in collaboration with the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER). He is interested in decision modelling, value of information/implementation research as well as the econometric and health policy applications of discrete choice models.

lubinga_solomonFor more details on Solomon’s work, check out his personal webpage at http://www.jonslo.com

  • What was your dissertation about?

In my dissertation, I abstracted from

well-known economics and socio-psychology

decision theories to study the incentives that drive the uptake of medical male circumcision (MMC) for HIV prevention in Uganda. My hypothesis was that a model that would combine factors from both decision theories would not only more accurately predict MMC decisions, but also be a very powerful tool to predicting the potential impacts of different MMC demand creation strategies.

  • How did you arrive at that topic? When did you know that this is what you wanted to study?

I became interested in the intersection of economics and psychology early on in the PhD program. I suppose this was because of my own proclivity to act irrationally even though I considered myself a well-informed person. This led me to ask why individuals in lower income countries in general do not value preventive health interventions. This specific topic built on a prior contingent valuation study estimating willingness to pay (WTP) and willingness to accept payment (WTAP) for safe MMC among men in high-HIV-risk fishing communities in Uganda. The results of this analysis indicated low demand (WTP) and high potential incentive value (WTAP) for MMC, suggesting that a high WTAP (a defacto increase in MMC price) may result in an unfavorable incremental cost-effectiveness or benefit-to-cost ratio for MMC. I was therefore interested in studying the relative roles of economic and psychological incentives on demand for MMC.

  • What was your daily schedule like when you were working on your dissertation?

I never had a set schedule while I worked on my dissertation. I was also a teaching assistant (TA) for the online health economics course offered by CHOICE. I spent a lot of time in Uganda collecting my data. I would spend the day in the field (8:00am – 5:00pm) and the evenings (7:00pm – 11:00pm) performing my TA duties. It turned out that this was convenient (but challenging) because of the time difference between Uganda and the west coast. I also travelled to the UK twice for a choice modelling course, which was a great help with my dissertation. When I was in Seattle, I generally combined work on my dissertation with my teaching assistant responsibilities at the UW, with no set schedule. I simply gave what was more urgent the priority.

  • If you are willing to share, what was the timeline for your dissertation? And what determined that timeline?

I submitted my short proposal sometime in April, 2015. I defended my dissertation in August, 2017. Two major factors determined my timeline. First, the death of a close family member motivated me to take some personal time. Second, although I was fortunate to receive funding for my data collection activities, it took almost 8 months (between December 2015 and October 2016) to receive international clearance for the data collection activities.

  • How did you fund your dissertation?

As I mentioned, I was fortunate to receive funding for my data collection activities through a grant awarded to my dissertation advisor.

  • What will come next for you (or has come next for you)? What have you learned about finding work after school?

I am interested in academic positions in universities in the US, or other quasi-academic institutions (e.g., research institutes or global organizations that conduct academic-style research). As an international student, the main lesson I have learned is “to synchronize the completion of your studies with the job market cycle, especially if you are interested in academic positions in the US”.

Published by

Nathaniel Hendrix

Nathaniel Hendrix is a third year student at the CHOICE Institute. His dissertation is on the application of machine learning to cancer screening.

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